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When you first introduce your Wiki, you might have some trouble deciding what kind of content to put in your pages and how to title them.

Let's go over a few examples to get you started. We'll provide a few templates that you can use as well—just copy and paste them into your Wiki's home page.

Page structure for an organization-wide Wiki

In the When the Wiki starts to take off section in our introduction, we talked about separating your organization-wide Wiki and project-specific Wikis.

An organization-wide Wiki refers to a Wiki that an entire company, department, or team can participate in. So long as that organization continues to exist, they will continue to use that single Wiki. For that reason, it's extremely important that an organizational page structure is established to make information easy to search for.

The following information is frequently shared on this kind of Wiki:

  • Organizational charts for departments/teams
  • Information for new/newly transferred employees
  • Information relating to department procedures
    • Manuals, etc.
  • Records of meetings
  • Information acquired in the course of work
    • Information to be shared by the organization
    • Personal memos

The following page structure is one example of how this information could be shared.

Information to be shared Page structure
Organization chart for that department/team Add to “Organization chart” page
Information for new/newly-transferred employees Link to from “Page for new employees”
Information relating to department procedures Add as child pages of “Manuals” page
Records of meetings Add as child pages of “Records” page
Information acquired in the course of work Add as child pages of “Memos” page

Below we've provided a template that follows this page structure. You can start creating your Wiki by copying and pasting them into your Wiki's Home page.

Markdown notation

# _____ Department Wiki
* [[Organizational chart]]
* [[Page for new employees]]
  * Please link all information for new or newly-transferred employees on this page
* [[Records/Regular meeting - (2019-09-03)]]
* [[Records/Regular meeting - (2019-09-06)]]
* [[Manuals/Attendance management]]
* [[Manuals/Expense claims]]
* [[Manuals/Meeting room reservations]]
* [[Memos/Memo title 1]]
* [[Memos/Memo title 2]]

Backlog notation

* _____ Department Wiki
- [[Organizational chart]]
- [[Page for new employees]]
-- Please link all information for new or newly-transferred employees on this page
- [[Records/Regular meeting - (2019-09-03)]]
- [[Records/Regular meeting - (2019-09-06)]]
- [[Manuals/Attendance management]]
- [[Manuals/Expense claims]]
- [[Manuals/Meeting room reservations]]
- [[Memos/Memo title 1]]
- [[Memos/Memo title 2]]

Project Wiki page structure

A project usually lasts for a fixed period of time and leaves behind some results. After the project is over, the Wiki will no longer be updated, and only viewed from time to time by people wanting to look at the results. It therefore isn't that important to have the most clean page structure, so long as the results are clear.

If a project is to last more than one year, it is important to make information easy to search for, just as with an organization-wide Wiki. Let's work out a project-wide page structure to share with the project members.

The following types of information are frequently shared on these kind of Wikis.

  • Project goals
  • Project schedule
  • Project organizational structure & list of personnel
  • Information for new team members
  • Records of meetings
  • Mid-project deliverables
    • Materials made for internal debates, etc.
  • Final project deliverables
    • Materials finally delivered to customer, etc.
  • Information acquired in the course of work of particular relevance to the project
    • Information to be shared project-wide
    • Personal memos

The following is one example of a page structure for sharing this information.

Information to be shared Page structure
Project goals Add to “Goals” page
Project schedule Add to “Schedule” page
Project organizational structure & list of personnel Add to “Organization chart” page
Information for new team members Link to from “Page for new members”
Records of meetings Add as child pages of “Records” page
Mid-project deliverables Add as child pages of “Mid-project deliverables” page
Final project deliverables Add as child pages of “Deliverables” page
Information acquired in the course of work Add as child pages of “Memos” page

The following is a template that follows this page structure. You can start creating your Wiki by copying and pasting them into your Wiki's home page.

Markdown notation

# ______ Project Wiki
* [[Goals]]
* [[Schedule]]
* [[Organizational chart]]
* [[Page for new members]]
  * Please link all information for new members on this page
* [[Records/Regular meeting - (2019-09-03)]]
* [[Records/Special meeting - (2019-09-06)]]
* [[Mid-project deliverables/Materials for first review]]
* [[Mid-project deliverables/Materials for second review]]
* [[Deliverables/Specification document]]
* [[Deliverables/Manual]]
* [[Memos/Memo title 1]]
* [[Memos/Memo title 2]]

Backlog notation

* ______ Project Wiki
- [[Goals]]
- [[Schedule]]
- [[Organizational chart]]
- [[Page for new members]]
-- Please link all information for new members on this page
- [[Records/Regular meeting - (2019-09-03)]]
- [[Records/Special meeting - (2019-09-06)]]
- [[Mid-project deliverables/Materials for first review]]
- [[Mid-project deliverables/Materials for second review]]
- [[Deliverables/Specification document]]
- [[Deliverables/Manual]]
- [[Memos/Memo title 1]]
- [[Memos/Memo title 2]]

If you have a lot of projects, we recommend standardizing your templates company-wide or department-wide. Doing so will make it easier for employees to get used to a new Wiki when transferring between projects.

Information that doesn't conform to your page structure

Adopting a page structure like the ones we discussed above make it easy to determine new page names, but they can make it difficult to know what to do with information that doesn't conform to that structure. Some people might think, “I don't know where to put this, so I won't bother putting it anywhere.”

To account for this, you can establish additional rules for adding information that does not easily conform to the standard page structure. Take the following rules as an example.

Example 1: Child pages of the “Memo” page can be named anything you like

The above template follows this rule. However, this might result in too many “Memo” child pages being made. In that case, the following rule might work better.

Example 2: Child pages of your personally-named page can be named anything you like

Markdown notation

* [[Memos/Williams/Memo Title 1]]
* [[Memos/Harrison/Memo Title 2]]

Backlog notation

- [[Memos/Williams/Memo title 1]]
- [[Memos/Harrison/Memo title 2]]

Revising page structure

Let's restructure the “Memos” page to make it more useful to other people.

Move pages to more useful sections

You can change a page's name and its parent page later on. For example, since “Memos/Notes on troubleshooting” will also be useful to new team members, it can be moved to “Page for new members/Notes on troubleshooting”

Ensure others know they can update pages

Pages that begin as personal memos can end up only being updated by that person, even after they're moved. Since the effort that any one person can expend is limited, make sure to acquire company/project-wide understanding that this page can now be updated by other people. This will ensure that the information continues to be updated.